Full Product List

We have made an alphabetical list of all our products and recipes for easy reference. Just click on the links!

3 Chilli Phall (heat scale 11/10)
Not an authentic Indian dish, this is everyone’s idea of the ridiculously  hot curry! We have included it in our collection just in case people are worried they will find our mixes too bland, or just like to show off!.  The hottest chilli in the world, the naga, is one of the three we use.  Feel the slow build-up of heat and have yoghurt and bread on stand-by!

Each packet contains two inner bags, the main one and the chilli bag, a mixture of the hottest dried chillies. For maximum heat, cook the  contents of the chilli bag in the oil first to allow the chillies to  develop to their fullest extent, then add the other spices. You can  leave out some or all of the chilli bag should you wish, but this does  rather defeat the purpose of the curry!

Aceh chicken curry (heat scale 5/10)
Aceh (pronounced achay) is a province in Northern Sumatra, part of  Indonesia. Arab traders initially introduced Islam to this region from  where it spread throughout the islands. This Arab/Indian influence means that this particular recipe uses ginger rather than galangal (see my secret sauce).

Auntie Ang’s Chinese curry (heat scale 2/10)
Auntie is a polite but familiar way of addressing a Chinese close family  friend in Singapore. This curry is very traditional but totally unlike  an Indian or South-east Asian dish. It is very mild and yellow in  colour.

Bangladesh Beef Curry (heat scale 3/10)
This includes our special Indian ‘6-spice’ mix and has a very unusual flavour. Black onion, black cardamom and black mustard seeds are all in there! Also good with lamb or chicken.

Bean curry (heat scale 4/10)
This is a recipe suitable either as a vegetarian main course or a side dish served with meat curries. Slightly on the hot side, but very rich and delicious!

Beef curry Padang-style (heat scale 9/10)
Padang is to be found halfway down Sumatra, and is known for its hot food. The recipe is set out for beef or lamb, but goat is also an option (though  very strongly flavoured and fatty, and hard to come by in the UK!).

British Curry – 1970’s-style! (heat scale 2/10)
We have come up with a tantalising version of the ordinary curry powder  you can buy in any corner shop. We are not pretending that it is a  wildly new product that will change the way you cook, but it might just  bring a new edge to old favourites. So dust off your tartan flares and  platform shoes and have a retro dinner party! We have given you lots of  ideas on our recipe page.

Burmese chicken curry (heat scale 4/10)
This recipe has ingredients that you may not consider to be traditional for a curry, such as sesame oil, soy sauce and carraway seeds, but they blend to create a delicious and unusual sauce.

Chickpea and potato curry (heat scale 4/10)
This is a recipe suitable either as a vegetarian main course or a side dish  served with meat curries. Leftovers make a delicious soup! See our  special section on leftovers .

Smoky Chilli Con Carne (heat scale 6/10)
Everyone makes chilli, but many are the times I have been to a restaurant or  pub, or visited friends, and eaten a plate of minced beef with beans  cooked in a tasteless tomato sauce. This combination contains lovely smoky chipotle chillies with just a hint of habaneros. Stirring in yoghurt is a good tip for cooling it down. Also a  fantastic vegetarian option (see below).

Chilli con Veg (heat scale 6/10)
Whilst we all know that ‘chilli con carne’ means chilli with meat, this mix  works just as well with a selection of beans and vegetables. See recipes for both summer and winter versions!

Coconut bean curry (heat scale 4/10)
This is a recipe suitable either as a vegetarian main course or a side dish  served with meat curries. It has a lovely tangy but creamy flavour brought about by lemon juice and lots of fresh coriander.

Enchiladas (mild version heat scale 2/10; hot version 7/10)
This can be traditionally cooked either with a red tomato sauce, or a green sauce which uses tomatillos. We have grown these in our greenhouse but they take up a lot of space for not very much fruit, so we would recommend buying them in tins as you would ordinary tomatoes. They can be hard to track down, but can be found at www.mexgrocers.co.uk , or, if you live in Kent, at Macknade Fine Foods.

Enchiladas with Chocolate Mole (heat scale 4/10)
This is a wonderful sauce using our blend of mexican chillies, serve with plain shredded chicken in a tortilla. Together with chocolate and ground almonds they create a very unusual but delicious flavour which is not at all spicy. Try preparing enchiladas with half  of them cooked with this mole and half with the green sauce, above.

Fajitas (mild version heat scale 2/10; hot version 10/10)
This is a very familiar Mexican dish but made with our own mix of home-ground, and in some cases home-grown, chillies.

Garam Masala (heat scale 2/10)
Traditionally stirred into plain dishes at the end of cooking to add more flavour. An Indian larder basic you might think, but we are discovering that having our own blend helps lift our spices above the competition. Even something simple like a korma is transformed with our garam masala. Hand-ground and blended, like everything we do, this looks, smells and tastes nothing like a supermarket offering.

Goan Green Chicken Curry (heat scale 5/10)
This recipe from Goa, on the west coast, is a classic Indian curry. Its name comes from the large quantity of fresh coriander found in the recipe, as well as the dried mint in our spice blend. Easily one of our most popular products.

Goan Red curry (Vindaloo) (heat scale 9/10)
This is traditionally regarded as a hot dish and a curry house stalwart for show-offs. Whilst our version is hot, we have not simply added more chillies. There are 14 spices in the mix, of which our dried habanero makes up maybe 5%. You may wonder why we are using something that sounds so Spanish in our Indian recipe, but chillies originate from Central America. We use over 10 different chilli varieties in our mixes, and this one just happens to suit this recipe the best. If you like really hot curry you probably grow your own chillies, so add as many as you like - we won't be offended! Failing that, the phall is at the top of the page!

Indonesian Korma (heat scale 5/10)
This is the Southeast Asian version of a perennial favourite, but with  lemongrass and coconut instead of almonds. It is also a little hotter!

Kashmiri Lamb Curry (heat scale 5/10)
This is a delicious dish, which even people who don’t really like lamb will  enjoy. It is creamy and mild. You can also try the lime and spice mix as a bbq marinade (see BBQ recipe ideas).

Keema Peas (heat scale 3/10)
This is a delicious Indian recipe, which you will rarely find in a  restaurant, although I have occasionally asked for it and they have made it specially. That is because when you already have the spice mix it is incredibly easy! If you’ve had enough spag bol and shepherds pie, try  this for size! Made to a very family-friendly heat level, most people  would probaby enjoy it with a couple of extra chillies.

Kichiri (heat scale 5/10)
This is such a simple and delicious vegetarian meal on its own, or wonderful served with other curries. If you don not want to soak the split peas overnight you can try with green lentils, which hold their shape very well.

Korma (heat scale 2/10)
We have included this recipe in case you are having a dinner party and  know that curry-cowards will be attending! A very traditional mild curry with almonds (no coconut). We have achieved a delicious flavour whilst holding back on the heat, partly thanks to our special garam masala, which we include in the blend.

Kuantan dipping chicken (heat scale 6/10)
This recipe can be cooked on the barbeque or baked in the oven, served with  salad and new potatoes. Spicy chicken pieces served with a simple dipping sauce.

Lentil dahl (heat scale 2/10)
This is the traditional lentil accompaniment to Indian food. A very simple,  non-spicy side-dish. A traditional tarka dahl would have whole spices  fried and stirred in at the end, but we have simplified it so you can  concentrate on the other dishes!

Madras Curry (heat scale 8/10)
This is the classic restaurant curry! It just had to be included in our repertoire. Adding tomatoes towards the end of cooking gives a certain freshness to the fiery sauce.

Malay chicken curry (heat scale 9/10)
This is a very hot curry with a lot of flavour; definitely a mix for the more adventurous diner! It contains pineapple, which may seem unusual but is an integral part of Malaysian cooking. Harvested pineapples would be left in huge piles by the road-side awaiting shipping to the local canning factory, and passers-by were welcome to help themselves. It adds a sweet tang to the sauce, and tinned really is better than fresh!

Marrakech Lamb rub (heat scale 7/10)
We say lamb, but you could use it with any meat as a very spicy rub. Use with caution! See our BBQ page for uses.

Massaman curry (heat scale 5/10)
This is similar to rendang but with more sauce. It was heavily influenced by Muslim traders, hence the name. Delicious with new potatoes and green beans, but the sauce is quite fishy and salty so best with meat and avoid prawns! Definitely not one for those with shell-fish allergies!

Peri peri (heat scale 6/10)
The classic mixture of Mediterranean herbs and North African spices. See  our BBQ page for recipe suggestions. Also great stirred into tomato  pasta for a really hot sauce.

Pilau Rice (heat scale 1/10)
The traditional indian companion to curry. This supplies you with enough to serve up to 10 people, so only one carton is needed to feed all your guests.

Malay Beef Rendang (heat scale 5/10)
Rendang originates in Sumatra, from where it spread to Malaya. Traditionally made with water buffalo, it is a quintessentially Indonesian/Malay dish. We have found, holidaying in Scotland, that venison is actually better than beef. The flavour is less familiar and the texture softer so more authentic. Cook it for as long as possible - the meat will melt away!

North Indian Meatballs (heat scale 6/10)
These have a bit of everything – dried mint, which absorbs liquid while cooking to give a lovely flavour – and lots of fresh coriander. A very simple dish which, being meatballs, even small children should love, especially as it is so easy to spice up or cool down according to taste. Good for camping! Try with spaghetti! Try a beef version and make tangy burgers!

Sambhar spice (heat scale 6/10)
A zingy recipe with lemon that goes perfectly with spinach and potatoes.

Satay – Indonesian spicy (heat scale 4/10)
This is a truly delicious beef satay recipe that goes perfectly with our peanut sauce. You can use fillet steak but you don’t have to – just make sure you really hammer it thin!

Satay – Malay-style (heat scale 4/10)
A more traditional chicken satay dish, although you can use other meat if you wish. Serve with our peanut sauce.

Singapore Seletar Yacht Club curry (heat scale 3/10)
This is a mild curry which takes Andrew back to the bad old days in Singapore, when he would be dragged out for a day’s sailing by his nautical enthusiast of a father. The most enjoyable days were when the sea was so becalmed that he preferred to spend the day in the yacht club bar (Andrew's father, not Andrew!), where the best thing (apart from the guard dog boa constrictor, which slept by day in the boat-yard, and prowled around freely at night) was the curry. We have done our best to replicate the flavour as Andrew remembers it. A true colonial feast, which we have dedicated to Wing Commander Neville Shorrick, who was there too!

Spicy Potatoes (heat scale 5/10)

Excellent served as a vegetarian option or side dish with meat curries. Better than Bombay Potatoes! See our leftovers page (should you need to!).

Sri Lankan Chicken Curry (heat scale 7/10)
This is supposed to be a really hot curry but with a lot of flavour, but it is so delicious we have toned it down so people are not put off by the heat level. A very popular blend. Add your own fresh chillies if you want to.

Sulawesi Beef curry (heat scale 5/10)
Sulawesi, in Indonesia, is an odd-shaped island with 4 archipelagos. The spice islands to the  south-east were fought over by the Portuguese, Dutch and English in the  16th and 17th centuries, and are home to those fabled spices, the clove  and nutmeg. In the late 17th century England's holding was swapped with  the Dutch for an island on the North American seaboard. This settlement  was renamed New York. This is a delicious curry with a coconut base and  the addition of potatoes and a slosh of soy sauce. We have recently tried it with both chicken and butternut squash, and both work fabulously.

Taco Oaxaca-style (heat scale 3/10) – perfect for chicken!

Taco Yucatan-style (heat scale 10/10) – very hot! Not for the faint-hearted!

Tandoori Chicken (heat scale 3/10)

This recipe can be cooked on the barbeque or baked in the oven, served with salad and rice. Chicken on the bone is traditional, but use breast rather than all leg or thigh. Full of flavour without being spicy!

Tikka Masala Mix (heat scale 2/10)
This is another restaurant staple, without which no collection would be complete! The spice mix is also perfect for marinades in the barbeque season (see our BBQ recipes). Eat with the sauce given in our recipe or try dry with salad and raita. Not as bland as you would expect!

 

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